/How does chilled water air conditioning work
How does chilled water air conditioning work 2017-11-06T15:51:06+00:00

How Does Chilled Water Air Conditioning Work?

Learn everything you need to know quickly:

  • Cool a room using cold water instead of cold air
  • Water circulated throughout the building through pipes
  • The Lando chilled water air conditioning work like a radiator
  • Control the climate for your home

A chilled water air conditioning work to cool a room using cold water instead of cold air.

A reservoir holds a water and glycol mixture that is circulated throughout the building through pipes. Inside each room, there are air handlers, which work in the same way as traditional air conditioning. The cold water is run over cooling coils inside the air handler and a fan blows the air from the room over the coils.

More and more homes are using this system to air-conditioned their entire house because of its cost-effectiveness and no hazard of having refrigerant piped all over the house.

The Lando chilled water air conditioning works like a radiator, but instead of steam, cold water is poured over coils inside the handler.

A small fan blows air over these coils cooling the air as it moves into the room.

The key to the system is a Lando chiller with an attached water reservoir.

The chiller has a thermostat monitor the temperature of the water in the reservoir, and therefore the rest of the system. If the water temperature rises above a certain level, the chiller stop working. It cools the water back down with a compressor that raises the pressure of a refrigerant in the system and passes it through an expansion valve which instantly allows it to expand into a gas. The gas is cold and helps to pull heat from the water in the pipes. As the gas warms it condenses and may even become a hot liquid, while the water grows cold and is sent through pipes in the home to handlers.

Overall, the water-chilled cooling conditioning is a great way to control the climate for your home, office, factory, and building etc. Please contact us for more information.

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